Philly Property of the Day: 204 Carpenter

Here’s a cute corner rowhouse in Queen Village at 204 Carpenter Street, which is a block that’s a cul-de-sac. Specs: Three bedrooms; one bath; some nice original details like the wooden ceiling beams and a wood-burning stove; some visible modern upgrades, particularly to the bath; and a price tag of $339,000, which has been lowered from an unspecified amount, though it came online in mid-July, peak selling season. Is the fact that there’s only one bathroom hurting this attractive puppy, or is the price just not realistic?
Listed by Jacqui Greenberg at Coldwell Banker

[FOR STUFF LIKE THIS, IT MIGHT BE POSSIBLE TO LINK BACK TO STUFF FROM PHILLY MAG ABOUT SCHOOLS IN QUEEN VILLAGE OR SUCH, IF THAT DOESN[T SEEM TOO PANDERING.]

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Get Paid to Make Your Pretty House in Society Hill Even Prettier

THIS NEWS, FOR A QUALITY OF LIFE POST, IS HOPELESSLY OUT OF DATE, BUT I KNOW THAT ALL OF THE CIVIC ASSOCIATIONS SEND OUT REGULAR EMAIL BLAST RE: CRIME IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD; HELPING TO BEAUTIFY CERTAIN AREAS, ETC.

Live in beautiful Society Hill? Well the Society Hill Civic Association wants to help make the neighborhood even more beautiful by partially paying you back for home improvements via an initiative called “Fix the Brix.” To quote: “SHCA will reimburse to any Society Hill homeowner 40% up to $300 of the cost of leveling their front sidewalk by a qualified mason. For more information, or to obtain a suggested list of masons, please contact: Martha Levine at marthalev@msn.com, 215-629-0727, or Frank Signorello at fsignorello@gexchange.com.” I’d settle for our landlord consistently having the heat and hot water running but, then again, I don’t live in Society Hill. [HERE’S WHERE I START TO PEPPER IN SOME SNARK]
Photo via

The Foreclosure Crisis: The Song That Never Ends?

ANOTHER “SERIOUS” MORNING REBLOG FROM NEWS OF THE DAY

The Inquirer’s Al Havens weighs in on the country’s continued foreclosure morass. While the article isn’t Philadelphia specific, here’s a quote from Jed Kolko, chief economist for Trulia, the real estate website: “Furthermore, the foreclosure inventory remains high in judicial states, mortgage credit remains very tight, and big future housing-policy questions are unresolved,” Kolko said, and “normal remains many years away.” Trulia, by the way, lists 8,807 foreclosures in Philadelphia, to bring the story closer to home.

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Move Over Loft District: Eraserhood has its Moment in the Sun

FOR A POST LIKE THIS, I WOULD DEFINITELY USE STRONG VISUALS; IDEALLY ORIGINAL PHOTOS I HAVE TAKEN LIKE THE ONE OF THE DIVINE LORRAINE INCLUDED HERE, ALTHOUGH THIS IS A YEAR-AND-A-HALF OLD. WHAT WOULD BE BEST IS A NUMBER OF ORIGINAL PHOTOS FROM THE NEIGHBORHOOD

For several months now, a movement on websites and in local papers has be percolating about renaming the section north and east if Center City (sometimes called Callowhill or The Loft District) to Eraserhood–since David Lynch once lived there and has acknowledged that the area helped form his world view as an artist and the film Eraserhead–and now Temple University Professor Ken Finkel weighs in on the matter on The Philly History Blog. Here’s a snippet: “Our honest embrace of that lesser, as is, Philadelphia is a rare and admirable thing. Which is why we should welcome the idea that the heavily-patinated, “nightmarish post-industrial landscape” along the streets defined by this map to the north of Center City, should be known as “The Eraserhood.” Heck, Eraserhood even has its own Twitter feed and blog now! While Lynch hasn’t weighed in publicly about the “Eraserhood” moniker, here’s something he said recently about his time in Philadelphia: “I always say my greatest inspiration came from the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. So many reasons, the mood of the place, the architecture, what I saw and heard and felt. It was very magical, but laced with a deep tormenting fear and sickness. And I ate many steak sandwiches there.”

Poll: What Do You Think of the Old City Folks Who Oppose the 16-story Building on 2nd and Race?

This is just an example of how I would follow the Old City building controversy if it continued to make the news. Obviously the poll would not go on the same day as the news story. For a visual, if no rendering exists, I would take a photo of the site in question and create a Photoshop image of a 16-story building on the site.

A Race to Build in Old City

This post is an example of a cut-and-dry news reblog from The Inky about development. The added value, I think, is a bit of discussion about the folks who oppose the 16-story tower and how that plays with the city’s vision for the waterfront. In addition, the map adds visual context regarding the locations that I think a reader would find useful.

Today The Inquirer has word that three new apartment buildings are planned by the Delaware–two of which are near the Race Street Pier on the eastern edge of Old City, while the third is in South Philly–and all were approved by the Planning Commission. The story doesn’t end there, though, since evidently the 16-story building planned for 2nd and Race–the other two are 12 stories–is not terribly popular with some in the Old City Civic Association. To quote the article: “They have been fighting to keep tall buildings from encroaching on the historic neighborhood. ‘We find this to be an overbuild,’ complained Rich Thom, who heads the group’s zoning committee.” Perhaps some of the local outcry is justified in a neighborhood dominated by lower-rise buildings, but, on the other hand, the tower could quite conceivably increase the popularity of the Race Street Pier–which opened to great fanfare more than a year ago–and serve as a link to areas north of Old City. Not only that, but it would be in keeping with the Delaware River Waterfront Corporation‘s plans to increase the vitality of the Delaware.
Photo of Marina View building on Columbus Blvd. c/o BLT Architects and via Philly.com
Click through for a map of where the three towers are planned… Continue reading